Posts

  • Changing Perspectives: Nairobi Past and Present

    As part of the Building Shared Futures project, the Kenyan academics chose ten photographs from Bristol Archives and a Kenyan photographer, Chao Tayiana, was commissioned to take contemporary photographs as a response. These formed an exhibition that was displayed at the National Museums of Kenya in June and will be soon be on display at the Bristol Archives.

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  • Repatriating the Archives with Digital Humanities

    Some belated news on the Building Shared Futures project …

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  • Points on a map of Nairobi: Building Shared Futures

    Another task I need to complete for the next Building Shared Futures workshop is to use the metadata received from Bristol Archives to populate a map with points of interest. In this case, the popup displays an image from the IIIF server.

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  • IIIF server: Building Shared Futures

    For the next Building Shared Futures workshop, I had a task to have some images in the Bristol Archives being delivered by an IIIF server https://iiif.io/. This is a quick post to show the viewer on my blog, but with the images and manifests being delivered from the University of Bristol servers. A longer post to follow …

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  • Digital Humanities and Repatriating the Archives

    I was recently involved in a brilliant three-day workshop called ‘Building Shared Futures’, hosted at the Bristol Archives and the University of Bristol, including participants from both the UK and Kenya. It was attended by archivists, anthropologists, architects, historians, and a mix of academics, practitioners and experts in co-production and heritage. The event was both stimulating and exhausting.

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  • Dominus Hibernie / Rex Hiberniae

    Last week I attended two days of a three-day symposium at The National Archives (TNA), Kew, entitled ‘Dominus Hiberniae / Rex Hiberniae’. The conference was a mix of keynotes and papers on Irish history, historiography and the records used by historians to write the histories of medieval and early modern Ireland. I attended the conference because I hope to work with Prof. Brendan Smith on the creation of a TEI/XML version of an Irish Exchequer Receipt Roll (TNA, E 101/233/16) from the reign of Edward I with visualisations of the encoded data. Brendan talked about the roll at the event, pointing out that it is part of an underused series that can provide a rich source of information beyond royal finances with information on places, communities, individuals and trade networks.

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  • Manuscript Pamphleteering in Early Stuart England

    I’ve recently finished developing the Manuscript Pamphleteering in Early Stuart England online database. This project was a collaboration between the University of Bristol, University of Birmingham, British Library and the Historical Association and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

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  • Reboot!

    I’ve decided to reboot the blog to talk about things I’m working on, especially in relation to Digital Humanities.

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